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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 04/03/2014
Feinstein: This is not what Americans do. The report also points to major problems with the CIA's management of this program and its interactions with the White House, other parts of the executive branch and Congress. This is also deeply troubling and shows why oversight of intelligence agencies in a democratic nation is so important. The release of the summary and conclusions in the near future shows that this nation admits its errors. As painful as they may be and seeks to learn from them. It is now abundantly clear that in an effort to prevent further terrorist attacks after 9/11 and bring those responsible to justice, the CIA did make some serious mistakes and that they haunt us to this day. We are acknowledging those mistakes and we have a continuing responsibility
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 04/03/2014
Feinstein: We are acknowledging those mistakes and we have a continuing responsibility to make sure that nothing like this ever happens again. The full 6200 page report has been updated and will be held for declassification at a later time. I want to recognize the tireless and dedicated work of the staff who produce this report over the past five years under very trying circumstances. They have made an enormous contribution. And I also want to thank my colleagues, the Senators who have supported this review from the beginning and have ensured that we reach this point. Thank you.
Laura Poitras
Documentary Filmmaker and The Intercept Co-Founder
CSPAN 04/05/2014
Poitras: I think that that's the hope that the pendulum shifts back, but it's been a long time that it's been moving in one direction and further and further. You know. Astray from what we consider rule of law and ?. So why is Guantanamo still open? It's a national shame that Guantanamo is still open. I mean we have a prison where people are being held without being charged of a crime. At least I can say that I felt hopeful that there would be a corrective when the Obama administration came in you, but clearly that hasn't happened.
Laura Poitras
Documentary Filmmaker and The Intercept Co-Founder
CSPAN 04/05/2014
Poitras: I do think that, the thing that has been positive in terms of Snowden’s disclosures is it's reawakened an adversarial press, and the people have been shocked that these things, these decisions about surveillance have been made completely in secret, completely without public debate. And that there does seem to be some kind of an awakening, but I wouldn't call it a shift of the pendulum.
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
CSPAN 04/05/2014
Gellman: The crucial thing that's happened here is an increase in transparency. Obviously information is power. Secrecy is very great power especially when coupled with surveillance (makes us transparent and yourself opaque in government?). Because of this transparency you've seen not only journalism building on itself, but all kind of other things happen in the private sector, you have now for the first time in my memory a real marketplace for privacy. There were small outposts of that before, but they were boutiques. you now have large companies competing to demonstrate to consumers because consumers are worried about their privacy, because these revelations.
Glenn Greenwald
Co-Founder The Intercept
CSPAN 04/05/2014
Greenwald: I think Daniel Ellsberg is the most constructive example. Because in modern times, he’s universally, or not perhaps universally, but wildly considered to be heroic. If you invoke Daniel Ellsberg and point out that he’s a defender of Edward Snowden, almost nobody will attack Daniel Ellsberg. As a means to responding they’ll try to distinguish the two. But if you go and look at how Daniel Ellsberg wins talked about a 1971 and 1972 and through that decade, the court, the government, the media, and by most Americans, he was talked about in exactly the same terms as Edward Snowden. And over time he got so vindicated. And I think history so appreciated the information that he let us know about, what the government was doing, all that sort of died away and we realized that he engaged in an incredibly heroic and self-sacrificing act that he didn’t need to do for the public good, and I am convinced that Edward Snowden already today around the world is very much viewed in those terms
Jordan Robertson
Technology writer at Bloomberg News
BLOOMBERG 04/11/2014
Robertson: The story that Bloomberg broke today indicates that the NSA has not only known about the Heartbleed bug for two years since it was introduced, but it has exploited it for the last two years to steal information on internet users. The revelation comes in a week where internet companies have scrambled to upgrade their infrastructure to protect against these very kinds of attacks. So there’s a lot of animosity out there today about the NSA and the fact that they knew about this serious security bug and kept it for themselves. Fox: What has been the response from lawmakers and from the NSA? Start wherever you want in Washington. Robertson: The NSA hasn't commented on the story. But this has generated quite a lot of interest.
Cory Johnson
Anchor and editor-at-large for Bloomberg Television
BLOOMBERG 04/11/2014
Johnson: We actually just got a statement from the NSA and from the NSC. And I want to read it. But not the whole thing. Really quickly. The NSA , however, is denying that they knew about this until it was made in private sector cyber security reports. And the NSC, the National Security Council, say reports that NSA or any other part of the government were aware of the so called Heartbleed vulnerability before 2014 of April , 2014 are wrong. So the NSA denying it. Bloomberg News sticking with the story. So we’ll keep digging into that.
Cory Johnson
Anchor and editor-at-large for Bloomberg Television
BLOOMBERG 04/11/2014
Johnson: The disconcerting thing about this story, now again the NSA has denied this, but as a Bloomberg story and Bloomberg is sticking with it. And I think that the disconcerting thing is here, is what is the job of the NSA? And who are they protecting us from? And who are they not protecting us from? Are they willing to let our wallets get stolen, but to keep us safe from terrorists? Is that a decision that someone made along the line. That’s the really disconcerting thing about this story and something I think that’s going to be examined here as we sort through both the denials and the facts of the story.
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 04/14/2014
Goodman: (10 months ago, Laura) Poitras and Glenn Greenwald flew from New York to Hong Kong to meet National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden. Since then, there've published a trove of stories exposing the NSA and the national surveillance state. Poitras and Greenwald did not return to the United States until this past Friday when they flew from Berlin to New York to accept the George Polk Award for National Security Reporting. They flew and not knowing if they would be detained or subpoenaed by the U.S. government. In January, the Director of National Intelligence James Clapper described analysts working on the NSA story as “Snowden’s accomplices.
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